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How Do Ice Giants Maintain Their Magnetic Fields?

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A layer of “hot,” electrically conductive ice could be responsible for generating the magnetic fields of ice giant planets like Uranus and Neptune. New work from Carnegie and the University of Chicago’s Center for Advanced Radiation Sources reveals the conditions under which two such superionic ices form. Their findings are published in Nature Physics

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Three ways we’re exploring extreme materials at the Earth and Planets Laboratory

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Every day, the Earth and Planets Laboratory builds on the Geophysical Lab’s legacy to push the boundaries of high-pressure science. We develop techniques, probe new experimental questions, expand our computation capabilities, collaborate with colleagues, and fill our labs with top-tier instrumentation (and scientists).

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Behind the Scenes: In the high pressure lab with Jill Yang

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The top-tier instrumentation at Carnegie’s Earth and Planets Laboratory (EPL) makes it one of the best places in the world to study materials under pressure. Jill Yang is the high-pressure research technician in charge of making sure those machines work according to plan—and she takes her job seriously!

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Postdoc Spotlight: Tiange Bi predicts new materials under pressure

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Tiange Bi uses her interdisciplinary set of skills and computational expertise to predict the synthesis of new materials. Her research is primarily focused on crystal structure prediction of new clathrate structures and theoretical studies of the transport properties of iron alloys in the Earth and planetary cores. 

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Postdoc Spotlight: Thomas Shiell takes silicon synthesis to the next level

Postdoc Spotlight: Thomas Shiell takes silicon synthesis to the next level

Thomas Shiell is a materials scientist who works with the synthesis and characterization of new forms of silicon—specifically the newly discovered silicon allotrope Si24. Recently, Shiell used this new form of silicon as a starting point of a multi-stage synthesis pathway to develop a highly ordered form of silicon called 4H-Si for its four repeating hexagonal layers (pictured below).v

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Carnegie’s Van Keken Elected AGU Fellow

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Carnegie geophysicist and geodynamicist Peter van Keken, whose work reveals Earth’s thermal and chemical evolution, was elected a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union.

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