News

What is EPL thankful for this year?

What are we thankful for this year?

This year has given thankfulness a new perspective. In the spirit of the holiday, we asked the scientists and staff of the Earth and Planets Laboratory (EPL) to answer the question: What are you thankful for this year? This is how they responded: 

Read more...

Carnegie Geochemist Anat Shahar Elected President-Elect of AGU’s SEDI Section

Web Banner Template - Anat Shahar (1).png

The Carnegie Earth and Planets Laboratory (EPL) congratulates Staff Scientist Anat Shahar, who was recently elected to serve as President-Elect of the Study of the Earth’s Deep Interior (SEDI) section of the American Geophysical Union (AGU). AGU conducts elections every two years. These volunteer leaders commit themselves to advancing the mission, goals, and core values of AGU.

Read more...

Postdoc Spotlight: Daniel Portner's Tomographic Technique for Exploring Volcanic Systems

Postdoc Spotlight - Daniel Portner

recent study by Postdoctoral Fellow Daniel Portner harnesses a technique called tomographic inversion, normally used by doctors for CT scans, to create 3D images of these previously hidden inner structures. In this Postdoc Spotlight, Portner explains this new technique; what he found when he used it at the Cleveland Volcano; and how this study may raise more questions about the volcano than it answered. 

Read more...

Rewatch Sarah Stewart's Neighborhood Lecture: A New Creation Story for the Earth and Moon

Synestia A New Creation Story of the Earth and Moon

On November 12, 2020, Dr. Sarah T. Stewart, UC Davis, presented A New Creation Story of the Earth and Moon to a virtual crowd of more than 400 participants from all over the world.

Read more...

Where Were Jupiter And Saturn Born?

Saturn

New work led by Carnegie’s Matt Clement reveals the likely original locations of Saturn and Jupiter. These findings refine our understanding of the forces that determined our Solar System’s unusual architecture, including the ejection of an additional planet between Saturn and Uranus, ensuring that only small, rocky planets, like Earth, formed inward of Jupiter.

Read more...

Interview with Alan Boss: Earth-Like Planets Even More Common Than We Thought

Interview with Alan Boss: Habitable Zone Planets More Common Than We Thought

Today, a NASA study published in The Astronomical Journal announced that between 37% and 88% of sun-like stars might have rocky worlds orbiting in their Habitable Zones (HZ). The team of scientists, which includes Carnegie Science Earth and Planets Laboratory (EPL) astrophysicist Alan Boss, looked at Kepler data from over 80,000 stars and determined that there is roughly one Earth-like planet for every two sun-like stars in our galactic neighborhood, a higher frequency than previously imagined.

Read more...

Pages