Science News

Melting Temperature of Earth’s Mantle Depends on Water

Erik Hauri

A joint study between Carnegie and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution has determined that the average temperature of Earth’s mantle beneath ocean basins is about 110 degrees Fahrenheit (60 Celsius) higher than previously thought, due to water present in deep minerals. The results are published in Science.

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Hunting for Giant Planet Analogs in our Own Backyard

Floating Planet

There may be a large number of undetected bright, substellar objects similar to giant exoplanets in our own solar neighborhood, according to new work from a team led by DTM’s Jonathan Gagné and including researchers from the Institute for Research on Exoplanets (iREx) at Université de Montréal. It is published by The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series.

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Carnegie Wins Grant to Preserve Notable Geophysicist's Archives

Oliver Gish

The American Institute of Physics’ Center for History of Physics has awarded the Carnegie Institution for Science a $10,000 grant to organize and preserve the archives of scientist Oliver H. Gish and open them for research.

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Prediction: More Gas-giants will be Found Orbiting Sun-like Stars

Alan Boss

New planetary formation models from DTM's Alan Boss indicate that there may be an undiscovered population of gas giant planets orbiting around Sun-like stars at distances similar to those of Jupiter and Saturn. His work is published by The Astrophysical Journal.

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Team Makes Planet Hunting a Group Effort, Finds More Than 100 Candidates

Hires

An international team of astronomers released the largest-ever compilation of exoplanet-detecting observations made using a technique called the radial velocity method. They demonstrated how these observations can be used to hunt for planets by detecting more than 100 potential exoplanets, including one orbiting the fourth-closest star to our own Solar System, which is about 8.1 light-years away from Earth.

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A New Study May Resolve a Long-Standing Puzzle about Meteoritic Stardust

Larry Nittler

A new measurement of an important nuclear reaction that occurs in intermediate-mass stars may have resolved a long-standing puzzle about meteoritic stardust, as reported in a new paper co-authored by Larry Nittler published in the new journal Nature Astronomy this week. 

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