Science News

Probing the origin of the mantle’s chemically distinct “scars”

Basalt - Basalt, the most-common rock on Earth’s surface, encases green crystals--a geologic "nesting doll" phenomenon called a xenolith. Basalts such as this one derive from a section of the mantle that has been depleted in incompatible trace elements, w

 The composition of Earth’s mantle was shaped by interactions with the oceanic crust more than previously thought, according to work from Carnegie’s Jonathan Tucker and Peter van Keken along with colleagues from Oxford that was recently published in Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems.

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How Datathons Drive New Understanding of Earth’s Evolution

Datathon

Connecting data sets and wading through the sea of information to tease apart patterns and relationships is a major challenge for modern geoscientists. That’s where “datathons” come in.

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Meteorite strikes may create unexpected form of silica

Crator in Arizona

When a meteorite hurtles through the atmosphere and crashes to Earth, how does its violent impact alter the minerals found at the landing site? What can the short-lived chemical phases created by these extreme impacts teach scientists about the minerals existing at the high-temperature and pressure conditions found deep inside the planet?

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95 Cool New Neighbors Discovered by Carnegie Alum and Citizen Scientists

White dwarf and its brown dwarf companion Credits: NOIRLab/NSF/AURA/P. Marenfeld/Acknowledgement: William Pendrill

Carnegie Alum Jackie Faherty was part of a team consisting of citizen scientists and professional astronomers that recently discovered 95 cool brown dwarfs close to our own Solar System. Faherty was a co-author on the resulting paper, which was recently published in The Astrophysical Journal. 

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Iron rich meteorites retain record of core crystallization in Solar System’s oldest planetary objects

A back-scattered electron image showing one of the products of Chabot’s lab at APL mimicry of the core crystallization process. Liquid metal is on the right and solid metal is on the left. Image is courtesy of Nancy Chabot and Peng Ni.

 New work led by Carnegie’s Peng Ni and Anat Shahar uncovers new details about our Solar System’s oldest planetary objects, which broke apart in long-ago collisions to form iron-rich meteorites.

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NSF Awards More Than $1.6M to Six Studies at Earth and Planets Laboratory

 Glowing coiled filament used as a source of energetic electron

In early 2020, the National Science Foundation (NSF) awarded more than $1.6M to six projects from the Carnegie Institution for Science Earth and Planets Laboratory. Many of the projects are collaborative and together they span a broad range of topics, from deep Earth dynamics to how microbes survive in extreme conditions. 
 

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