Science News

Where Were Jupiter And Saturn Born?

Saturn

New work led by Carnegie’s Matt Clement reveals the likely original locations of Saturn and Jupiter. These findings refine our understanding of the forces that determined our Solar System’s unusual architecture, including the ejection of an additional planet between Saturn and Uranus, ensuring that only small, rocky planets, like Earth, formed inward of Jupiter.

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Interview with Alan Boss: Earth-Like Planets Even More Common Than We Thought

Interview with Alan Boss: Habitable Zone Planets More Common Than We Thought

Today, a NASA study published in The Astronomical Journal announced that between 37% and 88% of sun-like stars might have rocky worlds orbiting in their Habitable Zones (HZ). The team of scientists, which includes Carnegie Science Earth and Planets Laboratory (EPL) astrophysicist Alan Boss, looked at Kepler data from over 80,000 stars and determined that there is roughly one Earth-like planet for every two sun-like stars in our galactic neighborhood, a higher frequency than previously imagined.

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Deja Lu...nar? Why Does Water on the Moon Sound Familiar?

NASA illustration depicts water trapped in the lunar soil of the Moon's Clavius Crater and an image of NASA’s Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). Credits: NASA/Daniel Rutter

NASA kept the scientific community on the edge of its collective seat regarding “exciting news” about the Moon and speculation filled the Twitterverse for a week. But the big reveal may have left you with a sense of deja vu.  

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Postdoc Spotlight: Matt Clement Explains New Evidence for How Jupiter and Saturn Formed

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Matt Clement is a Postdoctoral astronomer at the Earth & Planets Laboratory who uses computer modeling to piece together this complex story of how our early Solar System formed. As Clement puts it, trying to figure out what happened “is a bit like trying to understand how to make a smoothie only by tasting the final product.” 

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Life on Venus? Six Carnegie Scientists Respond

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The September 2020 announcement that scientists found phosphine gas on Venus set off a buzz of excitement across the scientific world, leaving one question in the minds of many spectators: Did we just discover signs of life on Venus? Six Carnegie scientists respond. 

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Peculiar planetary system architecture around three Orion stars explained

New observations of GW Orionis, a triple star system with a peculiar inner region, revealed that this object has a warped planet-forming disk with a misaligned ring.

The discovery that our galaxy is teeming with exoplanets has also revealed the vast diversity of planetary systems out there and raised questions about the processes that shaped them. New work published in Science by an international team including Carnegie’s Jaehan Bae could explain the architecture of multi-star systems in which planets are separated by wide gaps and do not orbit on the same plane as their host star’s equatorial center.

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