science highlights

Earth's First Example of Recycling—Its Own Crust!

Richard Carlson

Rock samples from northeastern Canada retain chemical signals that help explain what Earth’s crust was like more than 4 billion years ago, reveals new work from DTM’s Richard Carlson and Jonathan O’Neil of the University of Ottawa. Their work is published by Science.  

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Seven Earth-Size Planets Identified: What Does it Mean?

7 Planets

Orbiting a star called TRAPPIST-1 not too far away, lie at least seven Earth-size planets that may have temperatures similar to Earth's. This discovery was announced today, February 22, 2017, at a news conference at NASA Headquarters. The study is published in the journal Nature. Here's a quick breakdown from some of our astronomers of why this discovery is important and just how Earth-like these planets really are. The study is published in the journal Nature

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Postdoc Spotlight: Geochemist Jesse Reimink

Jesse Reimink

Jesse Reimink has been around science and the outdoors his entire life. His father, a high school biology teacher, would keep him and his sister busy searching for rocks and insects outside for their collections. Today, as a postdoctoral associate at DTM, his rock collection has grown exponentially. This summer, he collected over 1200-pounds worth of samples from the Slave craton, a block of rocks in north-western Canada that has preserved a lot of old rocks ranging in age from 4 billion to 2.5 billion years old.

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DTM Scientists Participate in the 229th Meeting of the American Astronomical Society

Maggie Thompson

Tri Astraatmadja, Johanna Teske, Serge Dieterich, and Maggie Thompson participated in the 229th meeting of the American Astronomical Society, held in Grapevine, TX, from January 3 to 7, 2017.

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Postdoc Spotlight: Astronomer Erika Nesvold

Erika Nesvold

Born to one of the original Trekkies (her mother) DTM Postdoctoral Fellow Erika Nesvold grew up a self-proclaimed science fiction nerd, a hobby that soon evolved into her passion for astronomy. Today she ventures into the stars her fellow Star Trek fans dreamed of one-day exploring for themselves by studying the effects exoplanets have on their debris disks.

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