Campus News

Collaboration cracked the case on deep focus quakes

Blue Diamond Inclusion

When it comes to earthquakes, seismologists know best. But deep-focus earthquakes—those that occur between 300 and 700 km below the surface—have been a mystery to science for a century. Over the years, many scientists have suggested different answers to this problem. Still, the deep Earth is impossible to study directly, so the earthquakes kept their secrets until a group of scientists at the Earth and Planets Laboratory teamed up to crack the case. 

 
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Carnegie’s Hazen honored for lifetime achievement in mineralogy

Robert Hazen DCO Portrait

Carnegie Mineralogist Robert Hazen—who advanced the concept that Earth’s geology was shaped by the rise and sustenance of life—will be honored with the 2022 the International Mineralogical Association’s Medal for Excellence. The prize recognizes “outstanding scientific publication in the field of mineralogical sciences.”

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Former Director Linda Elkins-Tanton elected to the National Academy of Sciences

Linda Elkins-Tanton and her fieldwork team pose in front of columnar basalt from the Siberian flood basalts on an island in the Angara river.

In April 2021, Linda Elkins-Tanton, former director of the Carnegie Science Earth and Planets Laboratory (EPL), was elected to the National Academy of Sciences. Being elected to the Academy is among the highest honors a scientist can achieve. 

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Nearly 300 people delve into diamond science at latest Neighborhood Lecture

What can diamonds tell us about the Earth?

This month's Neighborhood Lecture, "Exploring for diamonds and what they can tell us about how the Earth works, " was presented by diamond expert and former postdoc Dr. Graham Pearson. In this hour-long talk, Pearson explained in detail how scientists find and evaluate diamond mines. He also looked at why scientists at EPL may prefer their diamonds to be a bit rough around the edges!

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The glove box that held the Moon

Apollo Glove box (1).jpeg

Postdoctoral fellow Nico Kueter writes about the surprising history of a rusty old glove box that housed the very first lunar samples. 

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Team Co-Led by Johanna Teske Secures Coveted Exoplanet Observation Time on James Webb Space Telescope

James Web Space Telescope

A team co-led by Carnegie astronomer Johanna Teske has officially secured observation time on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)—NASA’s newest space telescope—when it launches later this year. Teske is the co-principal investigator and will be leading the study alongside principal investigator Natasha Batalha (NASA Ames) and their team, which also includes Peter Gao, who will start as a Carnegie staff member this fall, Munazza Alam, who will start as a Carnegie Postdoctoral Fellow this fall, and current staff member Anat Shahar.

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