Campus News

The glove box that held the Moon

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Postdoctoral fellow Nico Kueter writes about the surprising history of a rusty old glove box that housed the very first lunar samples. 

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Team Co-Led by Johanna Teske Secures Coveted Exoplanet Observation Time on James Webb Space Telescope

James Web Space Telescope

A team co-led by Carnegie astronomer Johanna Teske has officially secured observation time on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)—NASA’s newest space telescope—when it launches later this year. Teske is the co-principal investigator and will be leading the study alongside principal investigator Natasha Batalha (NASA Ames) and their team, which also includes Peter Gao, who will start as a Carnegie staff member this fall, Munazza Alam, who will start as a Carnegie Postdoctoral Fellow this fall, and current staff member Anat Shahar.

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Carnegie scientists answer your astronomy questions

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You asked and we answered! Earlier this month our astronomers asked our digital community to submit questions that were out of this world. We received many great questions ranging from the origins of life to the existence of dark matter.

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Martian Meteorite Mineral Named After Carnegie’s Yingwei Fei

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Carnegie's Yingwei Fei is the namesake of an iron-titanuim oxide mineral discovered in a meteorite that originated on Mars. Caltech’s Chi Ma announced the find this week at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference.

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Three women from our past who paved the way for women in science today

Women in science 2021

Since the 1920s, there have been women doing scientific research at the Earth and Planets Laboratory. However, it wasn’t that long ago that women had to fight for a spot on the team, a turn at a telescope, or even just to walk in the door. In this article, we highlight the work of three EPL scientists who paved the way. 

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Our top 6 questions in astronomy and astrophysics

A closer look at astronomy and astrophysics

At the Earth and Planets Laboratory (EPL), the astronomy and astrophysics team explores space to find distant planets and understand their (and our!) origins. In this article, we’ve distilled this work into our top six research questions (with a couple of extras sprinkled in.) Each question is complex and connected to the others in a way that requires EPL scientists to collaborate across research interests to answer. 

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