astronomy

Steam Worlds: The Mystery of How Gas Giants Form

From left: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune at approximate relative sizes. The gas planets in our Solar System are gigantic compared to Earth. (Credit: Lunar and Planetary Institute)

DTM Astrophysicist John Chambers tells us all about his "virtual" worlds, what his new study suggests about gas giant formation, and how that can help us to better understand how planets form in and beyond our Solar System.

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What Did We Learn from the Neutron-Star Collision Discovery?

What Did We Learn from the Neutron-Star Collision Discovery?

DTM cosmochemist Larry Nittler shares with us his excitement about the explosive stellar event.

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The Mystery of Planet Formation at Carnegie’s Neighborhood Lecture Series

The Mystery of Planet Formation at Carnegie’s Neighborhood Lecture Series

The Fall 2017 Neighborhood Lecture Series kicked off with "The Mystery of Planet Formation," by DTM Staff Scientist John Chambers.

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Could TRAPPIST-1’s Seven Earth-like Planets Have Gas Giant Siblings?

TRAPPIST-1_NASA

New work from a team of Carnegie scientists (and one Carnegie alumnus) asked whether any gas giant planets could potentially orbit TRAPPIST-1 at distances greater than that of the star's seven known planets.

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Postdoc Spotlight: Astrophysicist Sharon Xuesong Wang

SHARON XUESONG WANG

Sharon Xuesong Wang reflects on questions that are not too different from those her research tries to answer about our Solar System: Who is she? Where does she come from? And where is she going?

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